Thursday, April 23, 2009

Og, the king of Bashan

Psalm 136 is the appointed psalm for evensong in just over two weeks. Pointing the psalm on the computer this evening, I discovered a line of particular theological importance, one which seems to call for special musical treatment:

11 comments:

shogart said...

Oh dear. Is *that* what I agreed to sing?

diplomatizer said...

Dude, King Og is a frickin' legend. You have no idea how long I've waited for a chance to sing about him... ;)

Sinden said...

Excellent. Long live King Og!

Robert F. Jones said...

I'd suggest pointing:

19 Sihon / king of the / Amorites:

...

21 And gave away their / land for an / heritage:

Osbert Parsley said...

I thought of that. Perhaps it'd make more sense as you suggest, but when I rehearse the choir I ask them to put an accent on the stressed syllable of each line (ie: king and land). I have a funny hangup about pointing; I don't think it's necessary that the stress accent always correspond to a change of harmony, and by putting a secondary accent after the barline, I can get a more flexible result. (This depends on being very clear to the choir on what you're looking for!)

This is why I point the psalms myself when we do Evensong - because none of the psalter editors share my eccentric views.

Robert F. Jones said...

Yeah, I got your point re verse 21; I'd like the verbal parallelism between vss 19a and 20a to be reflected in the musical setting. By the way, is the fff for v. 20 a reference to old King Og's enormous size? ("His sarcophagus of basalt was over thirteen feet long and six feet wide, and it may still be seen in the Ammonite town of Rabbah" Deut. 3:11, REB; other translations give "bed of iron" for "sarcophagus of basalt"; in any case, he was one big dude.

educatrice said...

We are singing all the way through the psalter and have just sung about Og - he occurs in ps135 as well (climbing up to Zion he would have been a good person to sing about). We sang John Milton's setting of ps136, where Og has been exised. 135 we did to an Anglican chant but with Common Worship words - works v well.
We're doing 139-150 next Tuesday.
We now thing a super king size bed should be called an Og...........

Keepitreal said...

The passages in palsms that you point to are not praises to King OG but are in fact David praiseing God for defeating King Og (the Last remant of the Giants of (Genisis 6:4) Who just so happens to have surivived the Great flood. this fact is something many people fail to realise. Not only did Noah, his wife, his 3 sons and thier wives survive the flood but so did King Og.

Remember Genisis 6:4 it's reference to "sons of god" (fallen angels) and thier mating with women , who bore children these children were giants and men of renown on the earth. But it was their evil on the earth that made god send the flood.

The passage Deu 3:11 alludes to his survival after the flood.

Deu 3:11For only Og king of Bashan remained of the remnant of giants; behold, his bedstead was a bedstead of iron; is it not in Rabbath of the children of Ammon? nine cubits was the length thereof, and four cubits the breadth of it, after the cubit of a man.

There is a lot more to this and I could go on and on about the bloodline of ths giant but I wont. I suggest you research it for yourselves

Hank said...

Apparently King Og wrote a recently translated book in the Vartican. Google "The Lost Book of King Og". If this is the case, those are the only known words of any of the Rephaim.

pcdirectuk said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
pcdirectuk said...

How Tall was Og of BAshan